Social Links: Settlement Declares Fake "Likes" Illegal; Pinterest's Impending IPO; A Bill To Criminalize "Social Media Extortion" - Media, Telecoms, IT, Entertainment - United States
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In what is being described as "the first settlement to deem such sales illegally deceptive," New York Attorney General Letitia James has entered into a settlement with a company that had been selling fake followers, likes and views on several social media platforms. Read how much revenue the sales were generating for the defendant companies.

Twitter is requiring parties interested in posting ads related to the European Parliament elections to verify their identities and confirm that they are based in the EU.

The online pinboard Pinterest has confidentially filed for an initial public offering, the Wall Street Journal reports. Find out the valuation the social media company is reportedly seeking, and how the company monetizes its platform.

A state appeals court in New York widened the scope of the discovery allowable in a personal injury case to include these types of posts on social media platforms.

Washington state senators have proposed a bill that would make "social media extortion"—defined as attempting to acquire property from someone in return for removing negative social media communications—a class C felony, which is punishable by a prison sentence of at least five years or a maximum fine up to $10,000. Read about the restaurant owner's experience that inspired the bill.

The app maker Niantic Inc. may have reached a settlement with homeowners who brought a nationwide class action suit based on trespass and nuisance allegedly caused by the Pokémon Go craze that Socially Aware reported on in the summer of 2016. Find out what the settlement would require of Niantic to do—and possibly pay.

California has made it easier for wineries to promote events over social media without running afoul of state law.

The up-and-coming generation of "unicorn" start-ups—new companies on track to quickly reach $1 billion in value—is looking very different from the first generation, which included now-household names like Uber and Airbnb. Find out how in this New York Times article.

A new app called "Tudder" is basically just like the dating app Tinder, but for cows. We're serious.

Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

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